Spirton The Cam & Klaus Show

22Jul/140

Framedoubling/60fps conversion guide updated

The framedoubling/60fps conversion guide has been updated.

It's here.

Changes since previous update:

  • Added more items to the FAQ
10Jul/140

Framedoubling/60fps conversion guide updated

The framedoubling/60fps conversion guide has been updated.

It's here.

Changes since previous update:

  • Added more items to the FAQ
  • Shortened the changelog to only the latest 3 changes by default
28Jun/140

Universal Media Server 3.6.4 released


This release fixes lots of bugs, improves transcoding speed, improves memory use and more!

For more details and the download link, please see the official website.

Changes since 3.6.3:

  • General:
    • Fixed a bug with filename prettifying
    • Fixed a bug with FFmpeg subtitles
    • Fixed a bug with adding files
    • Fixed ignored renderers
  • Renderers:
    • Improved support for Samsung devices
  • External Components:
    • Updated MPlayer/MEncoder for Windows to SB58, which:
      • Improves H.265 support
      • Improves buffer allocation
      • Makes seeking more accurate
      • Improves support for many containers and codecs
      • Improves speed
      • Fixes bugs
17Jun/140

MPlayer & MEncoder SB58 released

MPlayer logo
For more details, please see the main post.

Changes since SB57:

  • Fixed DTS-ES to AC-3 transcoding
  • Synchronised with r37225, which:
    • Improves H.265 support
    • Improves buffer allocation
    • Improves Opus support
    • Makes seeking more accurate
  • Updated FFmpeg to b152152, which:
    • Improves support for many containers and codecs and fixes bugs
  • Updated x264 to a5831aa (r2431), which:
    • Improves speed
15Jun/140

Universal Media Server 3.6.3 released


This release fixes DTS transcoding, adds and improves support for many renderers, fixes thumbnail seek position and more!

For more details and the download link, please see the official website.

Changes since 3.6.2:

  • General:
    • Added and improved documentation for more renderer options to PS3.conf (CustomFFmpegOptions, OverrideFFmpegVideoFilter and KeepAspectRatio)
    • Added support for configuring whether UMS can run just one or multiple instances
    • Made the renderer setting KeepAspectRatio more reliable
    • Renamed the renderer option OverrideVideoFilter to OverrideFFmpegVideoFilter
    • Fixed incorrect aspect ratios being cached
    • Fixed thumbnail seek position
    • Fixed bugs with FFmpeg subtitle styles
  • Renderers:
    • Added support for nPlayer, skifta and TwonkyBeam on portable Apple devices (thanks, MattDetroit!)
    • Added support for LG LM620 TVs (thanks, michal-sapsa!)
    • Added support for Sony Bravia W7 series TVs (thanks, shtirlic!)
    • Improved support for DirecTV HR
    • Improved support for OPPO devices
    • Improved support for Panasonic TVs
    • Improved support for Samsung mobile devices
  • Languages:
    • Updated Czech translation
    • Updated Spanish translation (thanks, AlfredoRamos!)
  • External Components:
    • Updated Apache commons-lang to 3.3.2, which:
      • Fixes bugs
    • Updated Logback to 1.1.2, which:
      • Fixes bugs
    • Updated Maven FindBugs Plugin to 2.5.4
    • Updated Maven Git Commit ID Plugin to 2.1.9
    • Updated MPlayer/MEncoder for Windows to SB55, which:
      • Fixes DTS-ES to AC-3 transcoding
    • Updated Netty to 3.9.1, which:
      • Fixes bugs
    • Updated slf4j to 1.7.7
10Jun/143

Why you should choose H-SBS over H-OU

Introduction:
You can either skip to the bottom of the article if you want to see the screenshot comparisons, or read through this to get the details behind the reasoning and testing methodology.

It's common for 3D videos to be encoded in one of two formats: H-OU or H-SBS. These stand for Half Over-Under and Half Side-By-Side. In the former, the video for the left eye is stored above the video for the right eye, while in the latter the video for the left eye is stored to the left of the video for the right eye.

Getting H-SBS or H-OU instead of SBS or OU is the best option if you are going to watch the video over a network using DLNA, which is how most media servers work, since the full resolution won't be used for full SBS or OU anyway. It will only display half of the pixels.

Additionally, a good encoder will have used a high quality resizer to halve the resolution in a H-OU or H-SBS file, meaning that the H-SBS/H-OU file will actually look higher quality when streamed over your network than a SBS/OU file - it's unlikely that the media server and other hardware will use a slow, high-quality resizer while you play it, it will most likely use a quick, low quality one.

Why you should choose H-SBS over H-OU:
When you increase the resolution of an image - which is what software on your playback equipment (TV, monitor, etc.) needs to do to a H-SBS/H-OU video in order to stretch it back to its original size - the higher the starting resolution is, the better your resulting image will look. If you try to double the resolution of a 50x50 image to 100x100, the results will be inferior to doubling the same image from 1000x1000 to 2000x2000.
This may seem obvious. Of course a resizer will be able to be more accurate when it has more details to start with. Even though you are doubling the image in both situations, the situation that starts with the most details will result in the highest accuracy.

With H-OU, each eye sees a maximum resolution of 1920x540. This usually ends up being more like 1920x400, with the other 140 vertical pixels being the black bars at the top and bottom of the video frame. This gives us a great, full horizontal resolution, but a very small vertical resolution. In fact, this vertical resolution is even lower than DVDs, which can use up to 576 vertical pixels (typically between 404-484 for a cinematic movie).

By contrast, with H-SBS, each eye sees a maximum resolution of 960x1080, which usually ends up being more like 960x800 after the black bars are taken into account. This gives us a much more even selection of detail.

Both methods give us the same amount of pixels in total - 1036800 pixels per frame - but H-OU makes it harder for a resizer to enlarge the image as accurately, since it's making the height so tiny. H-SBS halves the bigger number, resulting in two decent sets of rows and columns (960 and 800) instead of one large set of columns (1920) but one tiny set of rows (400).

Image examples:
It's all well and good to talk about it, but seeing is more powerful.
For the following images, I've taken the original image (1920x800) and halved it using a bicubic (neutral) filter - the best choice for an image that will be enlarged later - then restored the original resolution using one of two resizing filters. One is Nearest Neighbor, which is a low quality filter, and the other is Bicubic Smooth, which is a high quality filter. Most TVs will have quality somewhere in between the two. My Panasonic VT60 seems to use something similar to Nearest Neighbor, which results in some very low quality moments with a H-OU source.

I'm using a website called Screenshot Comparison, which allows you to compare images by holding the mouse cursor over them, it's a very convenient method.
For these comparisons, the H-OU image is visible when the cursor is not over the image, and the H-SBS image is visible when the cursor is over the image.

Image 1 using Nearest Neighbor
Image 1 using Bicubic Smooth
Image 2 using Nearest Neighbor
Image 2 using Bicubic Smooth

The most obvious parts to look at are the grills near the top of Image 1, the table near the bottom right of Image 1, and the details (lights, lines) on the ship in Image 2.

Important note: This article applies to monitors and TVs that use active 3D, not passive 3D. If your 3D glasses take batteries, plug in to recharge or have a button on them, then you use active 3D. Passive 3D TVs (like newer LG and Vizio TVs) should use H-OU, as widezu69 mentioned in the comments section below.

Filed under: 3D, Encoding 3 Comments
3Jun/140

Universal Media Server 4.0.0-a1 released


This release adds a web interface (visit localhost:9001 while running UMS to use it), improves transcoding speed and stability by default, adds and improves support for many more renderers and more!

Download:

Windows
Linux
OS X

Release thread

Changes since 3.6.2:

  • General:
    • Added a web interface, available at localhost:9001
    • Added a new transcoding option to allow H.264 video with AAC audio
    • Added documentation for more renderer options to PS3.conf (CustomFFmpegOptions and OverrideVideoFilter)
    • Added support for configuring whether UMS can run just one or multiple instances
    • Changed the names of transcoding options in renderer config files for clarity
    • Output surround audio (AC-3) instead of stereo (MP2) when using VLC (needs testing)
    • Enabled subtitles in VLC (thanks, tdcosta100!)
    • Made FFmpeg the default transcoding engine
    • Improved the TextWrap function, which makes filenames fit better on certain renderers
    • Fixed padding in FFmpeg for DVD video resolution
  • Renderers:
    • Added support for Google Chromecast
    • Added support for nPlayer, skifta and TwonkyBeam on portable Apple devices (thanks, MattDetroit!)
    • Added support for LG LM620 TVs (thanks, michal-sapsa!)
    • Added support for Sony Bravia W7 series TVs (thanks, shtirlic!)
    • Improved support for OPPO devices
    • Improved support for Panasonic TX-L32V10E TVs
  • Languages:
    • Updated Spanish translation (thanks, AlfredoRamos!)
  • External Components:
    • Updated Apache commons-lang to 3.3.2, which:
      • Fixes bugs
    • Updated Logback to 1.1.2, which:
      • Fixes bugs
    • Updated Maven Git Commit ID Plugin to 2.1.9
    • Updated Netty to 3.9.1, which:
      • Fixes bugs
    • Updated slf4j to 1.7.7
27May/140

Universal Media Server 3.6.2 released


This release improves support for wireless connections and many renderers, fixes lots of bugs and more!

For more details and the download link, please see the official website.

Changes since 3.6.1:

  • General:
    • Tweaked the default Wi-Fi settings for smoother playback on slower networks
    • Fixed automatic updating on Windows
    • Fixed a memory leak
    • Fixed several bugs on OS X
    • Optimized code
    • Improved logging
  • Renderers:
    • Improved support for Apple mobile devices (iPad, iPhone, iPod)
    • Improved support for DirecTV HR
    • Improved support for LG LA644V Smart TV
    • Improved support for Nokia N900
    • Improved support for Pioneer Kuro
    • Improved support for Samsung mobile devices
    • Improved support for Sony Bravia 4500
    • Improved support for Sony Bravia EX620
    • Improved support for Telstra T-Box
  • Languages:
    • Updated Spanish translation (thanks, AlfredoRamos!)
20May/140

Framedoubling/60fps conversion guide updated

The framedoubling/60fps conversion guide has been updated.

It's here.

Changes since previous update:

  • Updated instructions
  • Added more tips
  • Added to and updated the FAQ
  • Updated the link to MKVToolnix to always point to the latest version
16May/140

Universal Media Server 3.6.1 released


This release improves support for many file types, fixes many bugs, updates translations and more!

For more details and the download link, please see the official website.

Changes since 3.6.0:

  • General:
    • Made resuming more intuitive
    • Fixed the aspect ratio of thumbnails by default (thanks, tdcosta100!)
    • Fixed the buffer going nuts after automatic subtitle conversion (thanks, tdcosta100!)
    • Fixed support for URLs in playlists
    • Fixed error with thumbnails of resume files (thanks, tdcosta100!)
    • Fixed the user interface when hiding advanced options
  • Languages:
    • Made more strings translatable
    • Updated Czech translation
    • Updated Russian translation (thanks, Tianuchka!)
  • External Components:
    • Updated FFmpeg to builds from 2014-05-05, which:
      • Improves support for many containers and codecs
      • Fixes bugs
    • Updated h2database to 1.3.176, which:
      • Improves stability
    • Updated MPlayer/MEncoder for Windows to SB57, which:
      • Adds AAC encoding support
      • Improves H.265 support
      • Improves support for many containers and codecs
      • Improves speed
      • Fixes bugs